Bear Manor Cotons

Bear Manor Cotons
Resources

We like to share some of the articles and websites that we believe offer insight and assistance to our puppy owners and visitors about some of the complex issues involved in raising a 'modern' dog. We take breeding Cotons very seriously and hope you appreciate the information below:
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First Aid
1. Where to find a Holistic Vet near you? American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association (https://www.ahvma.org/find-a-holistic-veterinarian/)

In Atlanta we use Dr. Kimberly Parker, Canton, GA.

2. Here is Dr. Pitcairin's Complete Guide to Natural Health for Dogs and Cats
(http://www.drpitcairn.com/books/dr-pitcairns-complete-guide/)

3. Here is a a Canine Care Kit (https://ambertech.com/store/product/amber-technology-care-kits/) that every Dog owner should have in their medicine box for Dogs: Amber Technology has put together a combination of products that supports the normal functions of the body to help keep your dog in peak condition.  This kit contains items that every dog lover needs in their home.  For those of you who like to travel, this kit comes in a sleek carrying-case that makes traveling easy. The Canine Care Kit contains:

1oz bottle            Paxxin -Digestive & Immune Support
1oz bottle            Vibactra Plus- Immune, Oral and Skin Support with Antioxidants
1oz bottle            Vintesta- Sinus Support with Antioxidants
1oz bottle            Life Cell Support- Liver Health
2 dram bottle      Kidney Rejuvenator- Help Supports Normal Kidney Functions
2 dram bottle      Adizone-  Joint & Muscle Support for Canines
One                     Bandage Kit
One                     Syringe (5cc)
Vaccines, Nosodes and Homeopathy
We avoid vaccines as much as possible, but here are some resources for you to learn and decide for yourself.

Below are articles on distemper and parvo vaccines in dogs, detoxing your dogs after vaccines, a chart on core vs. non-core vaccines, and a Vaccine Guide that they recommend, articles on homeopathy, nosodes, and how to use these alternatives with your dog.

1. Annual Dog Vaccination Dangers:
https://www.doglistener.co.uk/annual-dog-vaccination-dangers

2. Dangers of the Distemper Vaccine:
http://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/vet-distemper-dog/

3. How Detox'ing your dog can help:
http://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/dog-vaccinations-detox/

4. Which vaccines are necessary:
http://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/which-dog-vaccines-are-necessary/

5. More useful information
Truth about Vaccines (http://www.truthaboutvaccines.org/)
Core vs Non-Core Vaccines
Free Vaccine Guide

6. Nosodes: Can They Replace Vaccines? http://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/nosodes-can-they-replace-vaccines/

7. A homeopathic remedy we give at same time a pup gets any vaccine: Belladonna 30c, two pellets on gums

8. How to prevent Parvo naturally (http://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/how-to-prevent-parvo-naturally/)

9. Why Parovirus isn’t as scary as you think (http://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/why-parvovirus-isnt-as-scary-as-you-think/ )

10. A very good article on understanding homeopathy from "material science" perspective - with abstracts from a national symposium: http://hpathy.com/scientific-research/understanding-homeopathy-perspective-material-science/

11. Dr. Richard Pitcairn article on vaccines and homeopathic: http://www.drpitcairn.com/lectures-and-talks/homeopathic-alternatives-to-vaccines/

12. ABC of Homeopathy article, and list of research: http://hpathy.com/abc-homeopathy/homeopathy-for-skeptics/

13. Here is a link about homeopathic nosodes: http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2016/05/22/homeopathic-nosodes.aspx
Heartworm Meds
A really good article explaining heart worms, and how conventional medicine is not always best, with natural herbs and timing available. (http://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/heartworms-in-dogs/?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=Email&utm_content=Heartworms-In-Dogs&utm_campaign=HWF-Amber-Tech)
Let's Talk Bugs (Fleas, etc)

1. Diatomaceous Earth (DE): is a great product that kills bugs. Naturally. No poisons. Always use FOOD GRADE DE only. This is a great product to use around the house next to baseboards, under dog beds (not in them), in the folds of a couch or stuffed chair, bottom of kitchen windows, in any rugs (be sure to brush it well into the carpet fibers, and then vacuum lightly). ( http://www.richsoil.com/diatomaceous-earth.jsp)

2. CedarCide (http://www.cedarcide.com) is a company that produces lots of products for your yard and your animals. We use their shampoo, Cedar Suds Pet Shampoo when we want to wash out any fleas (use as a flea shampoo). We also have sprayed their Cedarcide Biting Insect Spray around areas that fleas might like (dark places under beds at baseboards and under rugs, nightstands, and at doorways to outdoors. It is cedar oil – so although safe for humans and pets, you don’t want to get it in your eyes, and make sure that any humans are not allergic to cedar oil in your house. We also use their Cedar Mulch – “Insect Repellent Red Cedar Granules” – in our flowerbeds and under trees outside in our back yard where the dogs play (and other animals with fleas like squirrels tend to play too!).

3. Another natural flea dip is Listerine. No joke. Get the generic grocery store brand or the actual Listerine brand (just natural no mint, etc) – it contains natural repellent essential oils such as eucalyptol and thymol, and well as antiseptic and anti-inflammatory ingredients menthol and methyl salicylate. When used as an after-shampoo-dip, it kills any fleas on the dog instantly. Its antiseptic properties also help to heal any flea bites on the dog's skin. Just be sure NOT TO GET INTO EYES of dog – we simply pour in onto shoulders and back of dog to tail, and then rub into underside of tummy and feet. Leave it on and towel dry the dog. We have also used Listerine in our carpet wet shampooer – simply wet rugs with Listerine and let dry – kills fleas (and maybe eggs?) in the carpets. It is not residual, like the DE powder, it only works on fleas it touches when wet. More info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Listerine
Fear Periods in Dogs

1. Understanding Fear Periods in Dogs (https://pethelpful.com/dogs/Dog-Behavior-Understanding-Fear-Periods-in-Dogs)

2. Critical periods in puppy development (http://ice.ucdavis.edu/~robyn/Korina/BCIdeas/Criticalperiodsinpuppydevelopment.html)

3. Critical Fear Periods in Puppies (https://berkeleyhumane.org/files/galleries/CriticalFear.pdf)

4. Critical Periods in Your Pup’s Growth (https://www.doglistener.co.uk/puppies/criticalperiods.shtml)
Doggie Diets

1. What's so cool about Raw Meaty Bones for your dog (http://www.rawmeatybones.com/)
Website for the Raw Meaty Bones.com folks

2. More about the Raw Meaty Bones for your dog (www.rawmeatybones.com/diet/exp-diet-guide.pdf)
Download Diet Guide for domestic dogs and cats

3. We use Blue Ridge Beef raw meat 2# rolls, Puppy Mix, Duck with Bone, Turkey with Bone, Quail with Bone, and more. http://blueridgebeef.us/products.html

4. The Honest Kitchen is raw dog food in dehydrated form - so it is easy to take along for travel, or in those moments where you forgot to thaw out their raw meat! Simply add warm water and wait 5 minutes, and you have a delicious gruel for your pet. https://www.thehonestkitchen.com/
Dog Training Books & Videos
Here are a couple of links to a great dog trainer, Zac George. Should give you the tips on how to start training your dog at home.

1. Zac George's Training Book (https://www.chewy.com/zak-georges-dog-training-revolution/dp/145789?utm_source=bing&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=Shopping-Product%20Targets-Hard%20Goods&utm_term=4584619890581723&utm_content=Penguin%20Random%20House)

2. Zak George's YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/zakgeorge21

3. If you choose to take your dog to a dog park, here are some extremely valuable tips. Please note that it says never bring an unvaccinated dog, or a young puppy to a dog park - we agree! http://blog.cedarcide.com/16-dog-park-tips-tricks
Travel & Lost Dog Prevention
1. Article by a Coton breeder friend, Kris Forke

2. A great micro-chip registry, Save This Life (Savethislife.com)

3. If you travel with your dog, here are some great tips for safety and fun. http://blog.cedarcide.com/9-tips-for-traveling-with-your-dog

Pet Products
Here are links for some standard products you need to keep your pup safe and sound.

1. Plastic kennel for traveling in car with your adult Coton: I like the door swinging either way. This kennel is sturdy and easy to put together. Their size XSmall (25”x17”x15”) works well for adult Coton, but if you wish to give your dog a bit more room, then their Small size (28”x20”x19”) is good too. Just depends on your car and how easily it fits. You can also take the door off and leave it inside house as a sleeping or play place! (https://www.petco.com/shop/en/petcostore/product/dog/dog-crates-and-kennels/petmate-navigator-pet-kennel#)

Kennel Pads to go in the bottom of these kennels are “You & Me Comfort Dog Mat” size Small for the XSmall kennel, and size Medium for the Small kennel: https://www.petco.com/shop/en/petcostore/product/you-and-me-comfort-dog-mat#

2. Clickers & food pouches for training: The Clicker Company (http://www.doggonegood.com/)

3. Puppy playpen for sleeping at night, or use in an office while you work. Add a piece of linoleum under it for floor protection. A good place to place pup’s beds, toys, pee pad and water bowl, for a short time when you need to confine your pet! (https://www.walmart.com/ip/IRIS-34-Exercise-8-Panel-Pet-Playpen-with-Door-White/15603594) or https://www.chewy.com/mypet-petyard-passage-dogs-cats/dp/111276

4. Puppia Harness & 6 ft. Leash. We LOVE these! Soft, sturdy and easy on your dog’s neck. Our Coton puppies take size Small at 9 weeks, and then grow into a Medium as adult. Choose any color! (https://www.amazon.com/Puppia-Soft-Dog-Harness-Small/dp/B0013N183G)
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Click on the graphic to download the diagram. Not only does it provide common terms for dog parts and locations, but it identifies where to measure to determine basic height and lengths of your pet. Length is measured from base of neck to base of tail. Height is from base of neck down to the floor. Make sure you 'stack' your dog so they are standing up straight before you try. You can use a straight stick at the back of neck to help measure their height.